A. J. Harman US Curtis Horse 5th Iowa Cav. Inscribed Non Regulation Off. Sword

Union Civil War non regulation officer's sword inscribed on the blade to A. J. HARMAN. U.S. CURTIS HORSE 5TH IOWA CAVL. A.J. Harman was also known as Austin Harmon. He was a representative recruit for Richard T. Wellslager. This means Richard was drafted and paid Austin to take his place in the service. Austin enlisted on 8/19 1864 as a private. He was mustered into A Co. 5th IA cavalry on 8/19 1864. He mustered out on 6/17 1865 in Nashville, TN. The 5th Iowa cavalry was originally known as the Curtis Horse. Austin likely purchased and had his sword inscribed with the money he received from Mr. Wellslager. He used this sword as his cavalry sabre and it shows wartime service. The blade as been sharpened and shows numerous little edge dings. The grip is sharkskin with some areas of lose, the wire is present. The hard guard and backstrap are brass with the guard having a spread wing eagle, US and E PLURIBUS UNUM. The blade is nicely inscribed along one side. The ricasso is maker marked on one side P.D.L., inside and oval. The sword was nickle plated after the War for GAR hall display. The nickle plating has worn off on a portion of the hand guard. The hand guard also shows traces of gold paint from its GAR Hall days. The nut on top of the pommel is missing. The hand guard has only slight movement and is pretty tight. The scabbard is original and has its throat and both rings with a dent on one side down near the drag. The scabbard has an overall light brownish patina and shows evidence of having been nickle plated after the War with much having since worn away. The scabbard also shows traces of old gold paint in spots. I took many clear pictures of this sword and scabbard so you can see its exact condition. It is a neat inscribed officer's sword carried by an Iowa cavalry soldier..... $1750.......Here is the information listed for the 5th Iowa Cavalry. Iowa Fifth Cavalry. Cols., William W. Lowe, John M. Young, Lieut.Cols., Matthewson T. Patrick, Harlan Baird, Erastus G. McNeely; Majs., Carl S. Boernstein, William Kelsay, Alfred B. Brackett, Harlan Baird, John M. Young. Jeremiah C. Wilcox, Charles A. B. Langdon, J. M. Limbocker, William C. McBeath. The 5th cavalry was composed of companies from different states and can scarcely be called an Iowa regiment. It was originally known as the "Curtis Horse," organized by order of Gen. Fremont. Before the close of the war there were consolidated with it two companies of the 5th IA infantry, the fragments that were left of that regiment after a glorious career. Nebraska, Minnesota, Iowa and Missouri all had companies in the regiment, and its colonel, W. W. Lowe, was a captain of the regular army. It did not get to the front till near the spring of 1862 and even then was kept for a whole year in the neighborhood of Forts Henry and Heiman, Tenn. Much guard duty, reconnoitering and scouting were done during the spring and summer. In one of the forays, made in May by a part of the command to the little town of Paris, it was surprised and half the men present were killed, wounded or captured. In June, the regiment by order, gave up its title of the "Curtis Horse," and from then on was designated as the 5th IA cavalry. Late the following August Fort Donelson was attacked by 800 Confederate cavalry and infantry, but they were repulsed. The 5th pursued and had a spirited fight with them at Cumberland iron works. The autumn was spent at Fort Heiman, with here and there a serious scout or raid. All the spring and early summer of 1863 the regiment spent in garrisoning Fort Donelson and scouting in the neighborhood. About midsummer the command was transferred to Murfreesboro, where it became a part of the force under Gen. Rosecrans, and all that autumn the men rode up and down Tennessee chasing and capturing guerrillas. On Oct. 9 the command rushed on to a retreating column of Wheeler at Sugar creek and charged it with such impetuosity as to kill 30 of the Confederates, wound as many more, and capture 100. The regiment went into camp at Maysville and while there a picked force of 400 men made a rapid movement to the Tennessee river above Decatur, captured a lot of Confederate ferry boats, and cleared the river of Confederates and guerrillas for many miles. On New Year, 1864 the regiment had reenlisted, and shortly after went home on furlough. but the early spring saw the men again in the saddle. In July they entered on the famous Rousseau raid, which was a great success and resulted in the destruction of immense amounts of Confederate war material, bridges, iron works, railroads, etc. Then after a little rest it took part in Gen. McCook's unfortunate raid to the Macon railroad, in which it fought well, but its losses were severe, 120 being killed, wounded or missing. In all the severe operations about Atlanta, whether on horse or on foot, the regiment did its hard and varied duties nobly -- in fact very nearly used itself up as a body of cavalry. Its horses were all done for, and the men, dismounted, fought in the trenches. By the end of November it was again mounted and equipped as cavalry and was at the front, disputing the march of Hood's army into Tennessee. Its first important conflict was at Duck river, after which the regiment fell back with the army to Nashville, and when the great battle before that city was fought it took part at the extreme right where it suffered but little. In the pursuit of Hood, which nearly annihilated his whole army, the regiment was very active, repeatedly overtaking and engaging his cavalry, with some loss. The close of the year found the regiment encamped on Elk river, resting and preparing for the great raid under Wilson to Selma and Macon, and in all that wonderful movement the 5th cavalry was always at the front. It then joined in the search through Georgia for Jefferson Davis, who was flying for his life, and when he was captured a company of the regiment guarded him from Atlanta to Augusta. On the way back from Augusta, the company captured the assets of the Bank of Tennessee, amounting to $8,000,000 of Federal money, $1,000,000 of it in silver and gold. Early in August the brave regiment, after years of hardship, heroic battling and faithful service, went home and was mustered out at Clinton, IA. Its losses were as follows: in deaths from battle, 56; deaths from disease, 132; wounded, 56; discharged. 224.

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